Hearing Conservation in Hunter Education Programs S ome twenty years ago, a warning was sounded that an unacceptably large number of our young people were developing loss of hearing in the high frequencies (Lipscomb, 1972). This finding has been replicated numerous times (Axelsson, Jerson, Lindberg, & Lindgren, 1981; Kramer & Wood, 1982; Peppard & Peppard, 1992; ... Edge Report
Edge Report  |   July 01, 1994
Hearing Conservation in Hunter Education Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles M. Woodford, PhD
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Norman J. Lass
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Edge Report
Edge Report   |   July 01, 1994
Hearing Conservation in Hunter Education Programs
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.08
History: Received February 14, 1993 , Accepted February 11, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.08
History: Received February 14, 1993; Accepted February 11, 1994
S ome twenty years ago, a warning was sounded that an unacceptably large number of our young people were developing loss of hearing in the high frequencies (Lipscomb, 1972). This finding has been replicated numerous times (Axelsson, Jerson, Lindberg, & Lindgren, 1981; Kramer & Wood, 1982; Peppard & Peppard, 1992; Plakke, 1985; Woodford & O’Farrell, 1983; and others).
Firearms noise as a major cause of this loss of hearing is supported by studies of the hearing of recreational shooters (Johnson & Riffle, 1982; Keim, 1969; Kramer, 1990; Odess, 1972; Taylor & Williams, 1966; Updike & Kramer, 1990). The effects of shooting on hearing can be drastically reduced or eliminated by use of adequate hearing protection (see Bourjaily, 1991, and Jamsheed, 1991, for a summary). However, in spite of this fairly straightforward solution to the problem, far too many shooters are not using hearing protection. Howard (1969)  found only 18% of the riflemen he surveyed used earmuffs or earplugs. Taylor and Williams (1966)  discovered that 75% of riflemen and 61% of handgunners they surveyed never wore hearing protection. In a survey of rural high school students, Woodford, Lawrence, and Bartrug (1993)  found that 86% of respondents with hearing loss never used hearing protection while shooting. Lass et al. (1987b)  found only 16% of high school students surveyed used hearing protection when involved in noisy activities, including firearm use.
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