Feasible Aural Rehabilitation Services for Busy Clinical Settings A udiologists in hospital settings often arrive in the morning to find their waiting room crowded with clients. Those in private practice, ever aware of balance sheets, often see as many clients as possible during the workday. As a result of such hectic schedules, many audiologists often do not have ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   November 01, 1994
Feasible Aural Rehabilitation Services for Busy Clinical Settings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray, PhD
    Senior Research Scientist, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078
  • Shelley Witt
    Senior Research Scientist, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078
  • Lorianne Schum
    Senior Research Scientist, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078
  • Danielle Kelsay
    Senior Research Scientist, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078
  • Donald J. Schum
    Senior Research Scientist, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   November 01, 1994
Feasible Aural Rehabilitation Services for Busy Clinical Settings
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 33-37. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.33
History: Received June 14, 1993 , Accepted February 11, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 33-37. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.33
History: Received June 14, 1993; Accepted February 11, 1994
Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant DC00242; grant RR59 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH; and a grant from the Lions Club of Iowa.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access