Audiology, the ADA, and Assistive Devices The Americans with Disabilities Act (the ADA) has the potential for a profound effect on the general acceptance of audiologists in our society. Whether this can be realized, however, depends on how we encourage adherence to its communication access provisions (Ross, 1994). Every person with hearing loss in this ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   November 01, 1994
Audiology, the ADA, and Assistive Devices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Ross
    Professor Emeritus, University of Connecticut
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   November 01, 1994
Audiology, the ADA, and Assistive Devices
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.05
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.05
The Americans with Disabilities Act (the ADA) has the potential for a profound effect on the general acceptance of audiologists in our society. Whether this can be realized, however, depends on how we encourage adherence to its communication access provisions (Ross, 1994). Every person with hearing loss in this country has experienced communication problems at one time or another. As we all well know, hearing aids are only partially effective in ameliorating some of these problems. Other kinds of devices have the potential to further reduce the communication consequences of a hearing loss. This is not a trivial consideration from the perspective of the person with hearing loss, as it encompasses work-related difficulties, and the capacity to fully explore and participate in the social and cultural offerings of our communities.
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