The Effect of Repetition Requests on the Intensity of Talkers’ Speech The effects of two requests for repetition by aided listeners on talker intensity were compared. On average, the simple repetition request "What did you say?" was as effective as the statement "I have a hearing loss, what did you say?" However, the effect of the second statement was more consistent ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1994
The Effect of Repetition Requests on the Intensity of Talkers’ Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brett A. Martin
    Program in Speech/Hearing Sciences, CUNY Graduate Center, 33 West 42 Street, New York, NY 10036
  • Mark Ross
    Professor Emeritus, University of Connecticut
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1994
The Effect of Repetition Requests on the Intensity of Talkers’ Speech
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 69-72. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.69
History: Received April 21, 1993 , Accepted June 22, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 69-72. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.69
History: Received April 21, 1993; Accepted June 22, 1993

The effects of two requests for repetition by aided listeners on talker intensity were compared. On average, the simple repetition request "What did you say?" was as effective as the statement "I have a hearing loss, what did you say?" However, the effect of the second statement was more consistent across talkers. In addition to increasing intensity, several talkers used additional strategies to enhance the reception of their message. The data suggest that use of repetition requests by persons with hearing loss is effective, and support the notion that informing the talker that hearing loss is present may be beneficial.

Acknowledgments
The software used for data analysis was developed by Mark Weiss of the City University of New York Graduate Center. Additional thanks is extended to the four listeners and to the pilot listener of this study. This work was supported by a research fellowship from the City University of New York.
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