Response to Cruz In his letter, Mr. Cruz suggests that some of the vocabulary items comprising the Spanish Picture-Identification Task need “correction.” Although we appreciate his input, we believe that Mr. Cruz’s concerns for the most part are unfounded. Some of his comments do, however, highlight relevant considerations in the task of composing ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   November 01, 1994
Response to Cruz
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • June A. McCullough
    San José State University
  • Richard H. Wilson
    VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN East Tennessee State University Johnson City, TN
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   November 01, 1994
Response to Cruz
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 76-a-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.76b
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 76-a-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.76b
In his letter, Mr. Cruz suggests that some of the vocabulary items comprising the Spanish Picture-Identification Task need “correction.” Although we appreciate his input, we believe that Mr. Cruz’s concerns for the most part are unfounded. Some of his comments do, however, highlight relevant considerations in the task of composing speech recognition/identification materials.
First, regarding Mr. Cruz’s specific comments on the meaning of some of the vocabulary items on the Spanish Picture-Identification Task, we would like to point out that we did not, in fact, “translate” the words from Spanish to English in our table. Rather, we attempted to provide an English word for the readers that captured the essence of the Spanish word, without elaborating on the grammatical distinctions (i.e., gender, number, person, tense) that occur in Spanish by changes in word endings. Since all of the words on the list were screened by native Spanish-speaking educators with a receptive language task (i.e., closed-set, picture-identification task) in mind, the appropriate grammatical distinctions are depicted in the illustrations corresponding to each word. For example, although we described both /beso/ (n.; or v., 1st person, sing.) and /besa/ (v., 3rd person, sing.) as “kiss,” the picture corresponding to each of these words illustrates the grammatical distinction. Similarly, the words /lloro/, /ronca/, and /llama/, while listed simply for the reader as “cry,” “snore,” and “call,” also are illustrated using the appropriate person and gender. Likewise, /viña/, listed as “vine,” is illustrated by a picture of a vineyard. Finally, although the word /balón/is not the most common Spanish word for “balloon,” it does appear in Spanish-language dictionaries as balloon, and was included in the list because of its similarity to the English word.
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