Audiologic Findings in Hyperacusic and Nonhyperacusic Subjects This study compared pure-tone threshold data, acoustic reflex threshold data, and loudness growth data for a group of 25 hyperacusic male subjects vs. a group of 13 nonhyperacusic male subjects. Pure-tone thresholds and acoustic reflex thresholds were obtained in 5-dB steps, using revised Hughson-Westlake procedures. Loudness growth functions were obtained ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1995
Audiologic Findings in Hyperacusic and Nonhyperacusic Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William T. Brandy, PhD
    The University of Akron, OH
    School of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3001
  • James M. Lynn
    The University of Akron, OH
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1995
Audiologic Findings in Hyperacusic and Nonhyperacusic Subjects
American Journal of Audiology, March 1995, Vol. 4, 46-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0401.46
History: Received October 21, 1993 , Accepted April 22, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1995, Vol. 4, 46-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0401.46
History: Received October 21, 1993; Accepted April 22, 1994

This study compared pure-tone threshold data, acoustic reflex threshold data, and loudness growth data for a group of 25 hyperacusic male subjects vs. a group of 13 nonhyperacusic male subjects. Pure-tone thresholds and acoustic reflex thresholds were obtained in 5-dB steps, using revised Hughson-Westlake procedures. Loudness growth functions were obtained with a fractionation (method of adjustment) procedure whereby the subjects doubled loudness, using a 1-dB step attenuator.

Results suggest that loudness growth was significantly different for the hyperacusic subjects compared to the nonhyperacusic subjects, but no significant differences in pure-tone thresholds or acoustic reflex thresholds were observed. When the hyperacusic group was divided into subgroups, however, the endocrine disorder subgroup had significantly lower acoustic reflex thresholds compared to the other subgroups of hyperacusic subjects. No other significant differences among the subgroups were noted.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank the administrators and staff at the VA Medical Centers in Indianapolis, IN, and Danville, IL, for their cooperation during this ongoing project. Special notes of gratitude are extended to Michael Clayton, Fred Drake, William Duckworth, Noel Johnson, and Andrew Robbins for their assistance in subject selection and medical diagnoses. During the Akron phase of the study, Christine Loddo assisted in subject selection and data retrieval. The results and conclusions contained herein are the authors’ and are not be be considered as official or as reflecting the views of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
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