Letter to the Editor “The golden eggs don’t have to be all in one basket.” In a previous Letter to the Editor, I discussed the need to “shape up” the academic training programs in audiology in a very fundamental way regardless of what we call the degree titles. Let’s now assume that all the ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   March 01, 1995
Letter to the Editor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kazunari J. Koike
    West Virginia University Morgantown, WV
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   March 01, 1995
Letter to the Editor
American Journal of Audiology, March 1995, Vol. 4, 61-b-63. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0401.61c
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1995, Vol. 4, 61-b-63. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0401.61c
“The golden eggs don’t have to be all in one basket.”
In a previous Letter to the Editor, I discussed the need to “shape up” the academic training programs in audiology in a very fundamental way regardless of what we call the degree titles. Let’s now assume that all the obstacles for the AuD are cleared away and that it has become the entry level degree to practice audiology. The following are possible scenarios, some of which even AuD supporters may not be happy about.
I am concerned that if we force the issue of the AuD too fast and too far, it will destroy the field of audiology, which has come a long way, and is unique in the United States, thanks to many pioneers of audiology. If there are those who would wish to obtain a clinical doctorate, go ahead and do it at a university that offers such a degree (only Baylor for now). It is hoped that it will strengthen the field. Like those who decide to pursue the PhD degree, the AuD should remain as an option, however. Not all universities and colleges offer the PhD degree in audiology. Nor are their programs designed to offer the AuD degree either. Don’t kill the master’s level audiologists for the sake of the AuD option by making the doctorate the entry-level requirement. Many master’s level audiologists are excellent clinicians. Again, this does not mean that the current audiology education is fine and dandy. It desperately needs a major overhaul.
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