Older Women and Hearing Health-related research and clinical management efforts only recently have begun to recognize gender differences. Women live longer than men, but are more likely to experience debilitating health conditions. Compounding their risk for poorer health and subsequent reduced quality of life are a variety of socio-cultural factors. In addition, hearing loss ... Short Course
Short Course  |   July 01, 1995
Older Women and Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dean C. Garstecki, PhD
    Audiology and Hearing Sciences, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3550
    Professor and Head
  • Susan F. Erler
    Audiology and Hearing Sciences, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3550
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Short Course
Short Course   |   July 01, 1995
Older Women and Hearing
American Journal of Audiology, July 1995, Vol. 4, 41-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0402.41
History: Received October 11, 1993 , Accepted September 6, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1995, Vol. 4, 41-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0402.41
History: Received October 11, 1993; Accepted September 6, 1994

Health-related research and clinical management efforts only recently have begun to recognize gender differences. Women live longer than men, but are more likely to experience debilitating health conditions. Compounding their risk for poorer health and subsequent reduced quality of life are a variety of socio-cultural factors. In addition, hearing loss is commonly experienced by all older adults. Even moderate hearing loss may greatly reduce a person's ability to communicate effectively and to maintain a sense of competence. In spite of its handicapping potential, little is known about the impact of hearing loss among the increasing, older adult segment of the population. This paper reviews health and hearing-related factors, focusing particularly on older women, and identifies issues for hearing professionals to address in future research and clinical management.

Acknowledgment
Preparation of this review was supported in part by a grant from The Retirement Research Foundation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access