Comparison of 1000-Hz Toneburst and Click Stimuli in Otoneurologic ABR The present study compares the utility of click and 1000-Hz toneburst stimuli in otoneurologic auditory brainstem response testing in 45 patients with cochlear sensorineural hearing loss and in 13 patients with tumors affecting the eighth nerve. Waves I and III occurred more frequently for the click stimulus than for the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1995
Comparison of 1000-Hz Toneburst and Click Stimuli in Otoneurologic ABR
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen C. M. Campbell, PhD
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 19230, Springfield, IL 62794-9230
    Associate Professor, Director of Audiology
  • Barbara A. Brady
    University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1995
Comparison of 1000-Hz Toneburst and Click Stimuli in Otoneurologic ABR
American Journal of Audiology, July 1995, Vol. 4, 55-60. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0402.55
History: Received December 20, 1993 , Accepted August 24, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1995, Vol. 4, 55-60. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0402.55
History: Received December 20, 1993; Accepted August 24, 1994

The present study compares the utility of click and 1000-Hz toneburst stimuli in otoneurologic auditory brainstem response testing in 45 patients with cochlear sensorineural hearing loss and in 13 patients with tumors affecting the eighth nerve. Waves I and III occurred more frequently for the click stimulus than for the 1000-Hz stimulus in ears without tumors. In ears with tumors, Waves I and III were generally absent for both stimuli. Wave V was generally present in response to both stimuli. The Wave V interaural latency difference (ILD V) was significantly different between groups for both stimuli but was not significantly different between stimuli. The sensitivity and specificity were similar for the two stimuli. In selected cases and as an adjuvant measure, the additional use of the 1000-Hz toneburst was useful. Recommendations for clinical interpretation and application are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge Sandra Thompson for her assistance in data collection and Steve Verhulst for his assistance with statistical analysis. Supported by NIH Grant K08-DC-00040.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access