Modality Specificity as a Criterion for Diagnosing Central Auditory Processing Disorders A central "auditory" processing disorder (CAPD) is an auditory perceptual dysfunction that cannot be explained on the basis of peripheral hearing loss. As a concept, CAPD has not been completely validated, and many issues continue to be controversial. A primary issue of concern is whether currently used tests to evaluate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 1995
Modality Specificity as a Criterion for Diagnosing Central Auditory Processing Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dennis J. McFarland, PhD
    Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, New York State Health Department, Albany, NY
    Wadsworth Laboratories, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509
  • Anthony T. Cacace
    Albany Medical College, Albany, NY
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 1995
Modality Specificity as a Criterion for Diagnosing Central Auditory Processing Disorders
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 36-48. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.36
History: Received August 18, 1994 , Accepted October 28, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 36-48. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.36
History: Received August 18, 1994; Accepted October 28, 1994

A central "auditory" processing disorder (CAPD) is an auditory perceptual dysfunction that cannot be explained on the basis of peripheral hearing loss. As a concept, CAPD has not been completely validated, and many issues continue to be controversial. A primary issue of concern is whether currently used tests to evaluate CAPD are sensitive to factors that are not of an auditory perceptual nature. In this paper, we consider the case for modality specificity as a criterion for improving the specificity of diagnosing CAPD. Demonstrating the modality-specific nature of sensory processing deficits is one way to rule out nonperceptual factors as explanations for observed dysfunction.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Jerome S. Haller, Robert H. Margolis, Lisa Hunter, Steven M. Parnes, Michael P. Robb, Donald Robin, and Rachael Stark for their constructive comments and criticisms on earlier versions of this manuscript. The editorial assistance of Christopher Bauch and three anonymous reviewers is gratefully acknowledged.
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