Preserved Hearing Following Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery Audiological Findings Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1995
Preserved Hearing Following Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher D. Bauch, PhD
    Section of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Wayne O. Olsen
    Section of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Charles W. Beatty
    Section of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Michael J. Ebersold
    Section of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Presented at the Thirteenth Congress of the International Electric Response Audiometry Study Group, Park City, Utah, September 6–10, 1993.
    Presented at the Thirteenth Congress of the International Electric Response Audiometry Study Group, Park City, Utah, September 6–10, 1993.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Balance & Balance Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1995
Preserved Hearing Following Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 59-66. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.59
History: Received April 2, 1994 , Accepted September 28, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 59-66. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.59
History: Received April 2, 1994; Accepted September 28, 1994

Audiologic test results were reviewed for 30 patients whose hearing was preserved following eighth nerve tumor surgery. Speech reception thresholds, 4,000-Hz thresholds, acoustic reflexes, and ABR wave I absolute latencies were generally unchanged or poorer following surgery; word recognition scores were essentially unchanged. By contrast, ABR waves III and V, and the I–III and I–V interpeak intervals, were generally improved postoperatively, including several patients who had clear waves following surgery despite absent preoperative responses. The improved ABR tracings likely indicate increased neural synchrony due to reduced pressure on the cochlear nerve following surgery, whereas the reduced hearing sensitivity probably reflects cochlear damage coincident to the surgery.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access