Identification of Hearing Loss in Children and Young Adults Using Measures of Transient Otoacoustic Emission Reproducibility Measures of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) reproducibility were obtained for 506 ears of 260 children and young adults. Frequency-specific and whole reproducibility (WR) data were obtained using ILO88 hardware and software and were analyzed with respect to pure-tone threshold and immittance data for the same ears. Reproducibility scores were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1995
Identification of Hearing Loss in Children and Young Adults Using Measures of Transient Otoacoustic Emission Reproducibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Theodore J. Glattke
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
  • Irene A. Pafitis
    Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Cynthia Cummiskey
    Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Gilbert R. Herer
    Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1995
Identification of Hearing Loss in Children and Young Adults Using Measures of Transient Otoacoustic Emission Reproducibility
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 71-86. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.71
History: Received August 18, 1993 , Accepted March 11, 1995
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 71-86. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0403.71
History: Received August 18, 1993; Accepted March 11, 1995

Measures of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) reproducibility were obtained for 506 ears of 260 children and young adults. Frequency-specific and whole reproducibility (WR) data were obtained using ILO88 hardware and software and were analyzed with respect to pure-tone threshold and immittance data for the same ears. Reproducibility scores were most robust in the frequency region of 2,000 Hz. In addition, the 2,000-Hz reproducibility score was the most efficient of all measurements (0.85 to 0.91) in separating normal and hearing-impaired ears, regardless of the frequency or frequencies at which the hearing loss occurred. Conductive hearing loss precluded detection of emissions. The present findings suggest that TEOAEs provide useful information in routine clinical practice and that they may be employed to screen for the presence of hearing loss in children and young adults.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Pat Bjornsti, Manju Kaku, Joan LaCoss, and Ruth Marin for conducting many of the audiologic evaluations and TEOAE studies used in this investigation. We appreciate the careful reviews of the manuscript provided by Barbara Cone-Wesson and two anonymous readers and helpful comments made by Sharon G. Kujawa. This work was supported in part by NIH grant DC01409 (TJG).
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