New Methods in the Molecular Genetic Study and Treatment of Hearing Loss In genetics, both discovery and methodology are advancing at an accelerating rate. As a result, the role of clinicians, and in this case clinical audiologists, must be re-examined from time to time to assure the sort of cooperation that will maximize results for both the investigators and the patients. This ... Short Course
Short Course  |   March 01, 1996
New Methods in the Molecular Genetic Study and Treatment of Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chris Halpin
    Audiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street, Boston MA 02114
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Short Courses
Short Course   |   March 01, 1996
New Methods in the Molecular Genetic Study and Treatment of Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, March 1996, Vol. 5, 83-89. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0501.83
History: Received August 11, 1994 , Accepted March 17, 1995
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1996, Vol. 5, 83-89. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0501.83
History: Received August 11, 1994; Accepted March 17, 1995

In genetics, both discovery and methodology are advancing at an accelerating rate. As a result, the role of clinicians, and in this case clinical audiologists, must be re-examined from time to time to assure the sort of cooperation that will maximize results for both the investigators and the patients. This article will briefly review the current state of molecular genetic methodology and relate the assumptions inherent in such methods to the character of the clinical data needed from the audiologist inthese cases. The basic assumption of most molecular biologic investigations of ear disease is that a binary (yes or no) diagnosis can be made by the audiologists and physicians as to the disease status of each member of an affected family. The binary assumption gives rise to a number of clinical diagnosis issues not easily understood by molecular biologists, and these issues are discussed in order to facilitate progress in genetic cases.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to acknowledge the contributions of the following clinicians and scientists whose comments and suggestions were instrumental: Joe Adams, Xandra Breakfield, David Corey, Michael McKenna, and Umang Khetarpal.
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