Evolution of Prescriptive Fitting Approaches The development of the modern-day electronic hearing aid can be traced back to early vacuum-tube designs in the 1920s. From their inception, hearing aid companies and their representatives in the field were concerned with how to fit these devices to the prospective hearing aid wearer. Methods such as mirroring the ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   July 01, 1996
Evolution of Prescriptive Fitting Approaches
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes, PhD
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405
  • This paper, along with the two papers that follow, is based on a presentation at the session on contemporary approaches to hearing aid fitting held at ASHA's 1994 Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA.
    This paper, along with the two papers that follow, is based on a presentation at the session on contemporary approaches to hearing aid fitting held at ASHA's 1994 Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   July 01, 1996
Evolution of Prescriptive Fitting Approaches
American Journal of Audiology, July 1996, Vol. 5, 19-23. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0502.19
History: Received March 13, 1995 , Accepted July 24, 1995
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1996, Vol. 5, 19-23. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0502.19
History: Received March 13, 1995; Accepted July 24, 1995
The development of the modern-day electronic hearing aid can be traced back to early vacuum-tube designs in the 1920s. From their inception, hearing aid companies and their representatives in the field were concerned with how to fit these devices to the prospective hearing aid wearer. Methods such as mirroring the audiogram (Knudsen & Jones, 1935), in which every decibel of hearing loss was compensated by a decibel of hearing aid gain, and the still-popular half-gain rule (Lybarger, 1944), in which 1/2 dB of gain was provided for every decibel of hearing loss, were two such methods that emerged early in the evolution of hearing-aid fitting strategies. The basic assumption underlying both of these methods, and any prescriptive rationale, is that there is an interaction between the individual’s hearing loss, or some other audiologic characteristic, and the parameters of the most appropriate electronic circuit for the hearing aid. Otherwise, if one response works well for everyone (“one size fits all”), then there is no need to “prescribe” the best circuit for an individual wearer.
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