A Total Quality Management Approach to the Provision of Audiology Services in a Long-Term Care Facility The number of elderly people in the United States is increasing, and the incidence of hearing loss is higher in the older population, where it is one of the most prevalent chronic disabilities (Gordon-Salant, Bialostozky, Lichenstein, Stach, & Weinstein, 1991). The provision of hearing health care should be important to ... Clinical Focus: Innovation
Clinical Focus: Innovation  |   July 01, 1996
A Total Quality Management Approach to the Provision of Audiology Services in a Long-Term Care Facility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine P. Seeger, MS
    University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Box 629, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642
  • Teri D. Holt
    University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Box 629, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Focus / Innovations
Clinical Focus: Innovation   |   July 01, 1996
A Total Quality Management Approach to the Provision of Audiology Services in a Long-Term Care Facility
American Journal of Audiology, July 1996, Vol. 5, 7-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0502.07
History: Received May 15, 1995 , Accepted July 24, 1995
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1996, Vol. 5, 7-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0502.07
History: Received May 15, 1995; Accepted July 24, 1995
The number of elderly people in the United States is increasing, and the incidence of hearing loss is higher in the older population, where it is one of the most prevalent chronic disabilities (Gordon-Salant, Bialostozky, Lichenstein, Stach, & Weinstein, 1991). The provision of hearing health care should be important to this segment of the population. Delivery of hearing health care may be particularly important in those facilities that serve the institutionalized older population— namely, in long-term care facilities.
Hearing loss is not easily detected by informal assessment. A professionally administered audiological evaluation is necessary to detect potentially handicapping hearing loss. Even for audiologists using appropriate techniques, testing the hearing of residents of long-term care facilities can be difficult due to residents’ multiple medical problems, including dementia and physical disabilities. Undiagnosed hearing loss can lead to severe communication difficulties between the institutionalized person and their family and health care providers.
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