Screening Receptive Communication of Older Adults in Residential Care Receptive communication of 341 older adults was evaluated in 9 nursing homes. The following assessments were conducted: case history, otoscopic examination, visual perception of facial movements, hearing aid function, sentence identification, and ratings of conversational fluency. The majority of clients reported hearing loss and low vision that interfered with their ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1996
Screening Receptive Communication of Older Adults in Residential Care
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Norman P. Erber
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
  • Chyrisse Heine
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: n.erber@latrobe.edu.au
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1996
Screening Receptive Communication of Older Adults in Residential Care
American Journal of Audiology, November 1996, Vol. 5, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0503.38
History: Received June 7, 1995 , Accepted January 14, 1996
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1996, Vol. 5, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0503.38
History: Received June 7, 1995; Accepted January 14, 1996

Receptive communication of 341 older adults was evaluated in 9 nursing homes. The following assessments were conducted: case history, otoscopic examination, visual perception of facial movements, hearing aid function, sentence identification, and ratings of conversational fluency. The majority of clients reported hearing loss and low vision that interfered with their communication. Otoscopic examination revealed that nearly a third of the ears contained excessive cerumen. Visual perception results indicated that nearly all clients could see the clinician's head movements, but that some clients could not see mouth or eye movements. Fewer than half of the clients owned hearing aids, but not all owners used them. Common problems related to non-use of hearing aids included blocked earmolds and dead batteries. Sentence identification and conversational fluency were improved by the use of amplification, but positive results often depended on application of communication strategies by the partner. Recommendations are provided for training staff and caregivers to increase their awareness of client needs and to modify their own behavior for more effective communication with older people.

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