Computer-Generated Hearing Disability/Handicap Profiles The goal of adult audiologic rehabilitation is to assist an individual in overcoming the communication and psychosocial problems associated with hearing loss. The methods used to quantify the existence of a problem and to determine candidacy for audiologic rehabilitation vary from patient to patient and facility to facility. For example, ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   March 01, 1997
Computer-Generated Hearing Disability/Handicap Profiles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Craig W. Newman, PhD
    Section of Communicative Disorders/A71, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195
  • Gary P. Jacobson
    Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI
  • Barbara E. Weinstein
    Lehman College, Graduate School and University Center, CUNY, New York, NY
  • Sharon A. Sandridge
    Section of Communicative Disorders/A71, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   March 01, 1997
Computer-Generated Hearing Disability/Handicap Profiles
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 17-21. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.17
History: Received April 25, 1996 , Accepted July 6, 1996
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 17-21. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.17
History: Received April 25, 1996; Accepted July 6, 1996
The goal of adult audiologic rehabilitation is to assist an individual in overcoming the communication and psychosocial problems associated with hearing loss. The methods used to quantify the existence of a problem and to determine candidacy for audiologic rehabilitation vary from patient to patient and facility to facility. For example, many clinicians rely solely on the pure-tone audiogram, whereas others incorporate the results of speech testing. Although audiometric data provide important information concerning degree, configuration, and type of hearing loss, emerging studies suggest that little information is gleaned regarding hearing disability or handicap. It is now widely accepted that pure-tone and speech audiometry alone are poor predictors of the impact a given hearing loss has on communication ability and psychosocial function in daily life (Erdman, 1994; Giolas, 1983; Noble, 1978; Weinstein, 1984) and candidacy for success from intervention (McCarthy, 1991). Consequently, other indices have evolved for assessing communication ability and psychosocial function. Self-report measures yield information about performance in everyday listening situations and, thus, provide a basis for determining hearing disability/handicap (Erdman, 1994).
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