Editorial It would be an understatement to say that there has been considerable tension among the related professional organizations over the issue of earned entitlement (EE) certificates, which the AFA began issuing in 1996. The motivation for EE by the AFA is to provide “expeditious unification of audiology to a doctoring ... Editorial
Editorial  |   March 01, 1997
Editorial
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   March 01, 1997
Editorial
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.02
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.02
It would be an understatement to say that there has been considerable tension among the related professional organizations over the issue of earned entitlement (EE) certificates, which the AFA began issuing in 1996. The motivation for EE by the AFA is to provide “expeditious unification of audiology to a doctoring profession.” Subsequent to a successful application process that includes a portfolio analysis, individuals receive a certificate from the AFA that states, “The Audiology Foundation of America Hereby Recognizes the Successful Completion of the Professional Recredentialing Program by…Who is Thereby Awarded the Designation AuD.”
At issue is whether EE may be used ethically or legally by practicing audiologists and remain a member in good-standing of either ASHA or AAA, the largest audiology professional organizations. The heart of the matter is whether the designation AuD equates to a degree conferred by an accredited institution of higher learning. AFA spokespeople have commented that the EE is “not a degree at all, nor does it purport to be a degree. It is a title (credential) based on a carefully developed recredentialing program.” (ASHA Leader, January 28, 1997). The AuD certificate, however, pronounces, “This credential acknowledges the recipient’s successful completion of the Foundation’s Earned Entitlement Professional Recredentialing Program by documenting training and experience commensurate with that of Doctoral Audiology Practitioners.”
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