Characterization of Problem Solving in Audiology Implications for Training Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1997
Characterization of Problem Solving in Audiology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD
    Division of Hearing and Speech Sciences, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232-8700
  • Gautam Biswas
    Department of Computer Science Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1997
Characterization of Problem Solving in Audiology
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 31-42. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.31
History: Received December 29, 1994 , Accepted March 3, 1995
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 31-42. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.31
History: Received December 29, 1994; Accepted March 3, 1995

Characterizing diagnostic problem solving by students, intermediates, and experts may facilitate an understanding of how to help students attain required diagnostic skills. Studies in other specialties characterize experts as spending more time and effort in understanding a problem before they begin to solve it. That is, at the beginning of a problemsolving episode, experts work to limit the problem space. On the other hand, novices often plunge immediately into the solution process. In order to learn more about diagnostic problem-solving in audiology, a computer-based environment, Simon Says©, was used to assist in the collection of problem-solving data. The results of two experiments revealed that accurate diagnosis in audiology appears to be related to the ability to set up patient problem contexts by analyzing presenting symptoms and history information and using the more focused context to interpret test data.

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