Article  |   March 1997
Assessing Release-Time Options in a Two-Channel AGC Hearing Aid
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rbentler@wjshc-po.shc.uiowa.edu
  • Portions of this paper were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conventions in Anaheim, CA (1993) and New Orleans, LA (1994).
    Portions of this paper were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conventions in Anaheim, CA (1993) and New Orleans, LA (1994).×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology
Article   |   March 1997
Assessing Release-Time Options in a Two-Channel AGC Hearing Aid
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 43-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.43
History: Received September 6, 1995 , Accepted March 26, 1996
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 43-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.43
History: Received September 6, 1995; Accepted March 26, 1996

The purpose of this study was to determine whether different release times, as implemented in a commercial two-channel AGC hearing aid, would result in differing speech intelligibility performance, user preference, or use time. In experiment one, 14 subjects were fitted with a two-channel multi-memory AGC hearing aid. Four memories were programmed to have identical frequency responses and output limitation characteristics. Only the release times were varied, with the low channel/high channel set as follows (in ms): 20/35, 20/150, 100/35, 500/7. Results obtained from the NST (+5 S/N), magnitude estimations of intelligibility, and data-logging of use time did not show any release-time pair to be superior to any other. In experiment two, 10 subjects participated in a forced-choice, paired-comparison procedure using the same release-time pairs from experiment one. Auditory stimuli consisted of three input levels, consisting of speech, speech in noise, and music. Results indicated no release-time pair to be superior in any listening condition. Results may be explained, in part, by the use of a curvilinear compression circuit and the milder hearing loss exhibited by the subjects. Future investigation of the effect of release-time variation should be carried out on circuits with adjustable compression parameters (and fixed compression ratios) with listeners exhibiting different degrees of hearing loss.

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