Audiologists as Knowledgeable Informants in the Area of Noise Acoustic noise can range from a nuisance to a health-threatening situation, often attracting public concern. Since the effects of noise are felt by individuals, the audiologist is often consulted to participate in legal disputes of noise-exposure concerns. The audiologist is expected to professionally evaluate the noise levels and report on ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   March 01, 1997
Audiologists as Knowledgeable Informants in the Area of Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carmen L. Taylor, PhD
    The University of Alabama, Box 870242, Department of Communication Disorders, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0242
  • Jori H. Abbott
    Birmingham, AL
  • B. Keith Ergle
    The University of Alabama, Box 870242, Department of Communication Disorders, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0242
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   March 01, 1997
Audiologists as Knowledgeable Informants in the Area of Noise
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 5-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.05
History: Received November 21, 1995 , Accepted July 8, 1996
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1997, Vol. 6, 5-10. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0601.05
History: Received November 21, 1995; Accepted July 8, 1996
Acoustic noise can range from a nuisance to a health-threatening situation, often attracting public concern. Since the effects of noise are felt by individuals, the audiologist is often consulted to participate in legal disputes of noise-exposure concerns. The audiologist is expected to professionally evaluate the noise levels and report on the legal and health implications of the findings.
Part of the evaluation process of noise levels involves knowledge of current federal noise mandates. During the 1970s, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Labor Department’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) were the two major federal governing bodies regulating noise control. When the Noise Control Act was first passed in 1972, the EPA’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was regulating sources of environmental noise. Unfortunately, the EPA’s noise office has been closed for almost 15 years, but OSHA still closely regulates occupational noise levels. Regardless of the status of the EPA/OSHA regulations, these agencies have been instrumental, along with the Noise Control Act (CFR, 1994), in defining areas of noise measurement and control. Through the use of electronic measuring devices, careful observation, and noise-management techniques, the audiologist is able to assist in noise control in any situation.
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