Editorial What made you decide to become an audiologist? We have probably all been asked that question at least once in our careers. Historically, many audiologists started out as speech-language pathology majors. In fact, until recently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) manual listed audiology and speech-language ... Editorial
Editorial  |   November 01, 1997
Editorial
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   November 01, 1997
Editorial
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.02
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.02
What made you decide to become an audiologist? We have probably all been asked that question at least once in our careers. Historically, many audiologists started out as speech-language pathology majors. In fact, until recently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) manual listed audiology and speech-language pathology as a single profession. The proposed 1997 modifications to this document will include separate categories for audiology and speech-language pathology under the “Health Occupations-Therapists” codes 21-1051 and 21-1057, respectively. This classification system is used by federal, state, and local government agencies to categorize occupations and collect data regarding job interests and skills.
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