The Efficacy of Auditory Integration Training A Double Blind Study Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
The Efficacy of Auditory Integration Training
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William Zollweg
    University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
  • David Palm, PhD
    Department of Audiology, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, 1836 South Avenue, La Crosse, WI 54601
  • Vere Vance
    Research Associates, Inc., LaCrosse, WI
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dpalm@gc.gundluth
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
The Efficacy of Auditory Integration Training
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 39-47. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.39
History: Received June 3, 1996 , Accepted July 16, 1997
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 39-47. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.39
History: Received June 3, 1996; Accepted July 16, 1997

The present study evaluates the efficacy of auditory integration training (AIT) in a population with multiple handicaps using a double blind experimental design. Thirty residents of a habilitation institute who had multiple handicaps received AIT over a 10-day period. Changes in hearing sensitivity and loudness tolerance, as measured audiometrically, and behavior, as measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), were evaluated at discrete intervals from 1 week to 9 months post-AIT.

Post-AIT data were then compared to pre-AIT data to determine if changes occurred in either hearing or behavior that could be attributed to the experimental stimulus (AIT). We found no significant difference in hearing threshold or loudness tolerance following AIT. Slight improvement in behavior was seen in both the treatment group and the control group, suggesting that factors other than AIT were responsible for behavioral improvement.

Acknowledgments
We thank the administration and staff of the Chileda Habilitation Institute in La Crosse, Wisconsin, for their support in carrying out this project. Moreover, we thank the residents of Chileda who served as subjects and without whose cooperation our study would not have been possible. Thanks are also due to David Hartman, Barbara Nimmer, and Brenda Rooney for their critical review of our efforts. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida, December 1995. This study was funded by a grant from the Chileda Habilitation Institute.
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