The Use of Large Group Assistive Listening Devices With and Without Hearing Aids in an Adult Classroom Setting During a hearing loss management workshop, 10 listeners with normal hearing sensitivity and 18 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss compared four group assistive listening devices (ALDs)—FM, induction loop, infrared, and soundfield amplification—to no system. Listeners with hearing loss were tested using the ALDs alone and using the ALDs inductively coupled ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
The Use of Large Group Assistive Listening Devices With and Without Hearing Aids in an Adult Classroom Setting
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Colleen M. Noe
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
    James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Audiology (126), Mountain Home, TN 37684
  • Stephanie A. Davidson
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Pamela J. Mishler
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dayton, OH
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Noe.Colleen@Mtn-Home.VA.GOV
  • Currently affiliated with James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee.
    Currently affiliated with James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
The Use of Large Group Assistive Listening Devices With and Without Hearing Aids in an Adult Classroom Setting
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 48-63. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.48
History: Received June 21, 1996 , Accepted August 18, 1997
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 48-63. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.48
History: Received June 21, 1996; Accepted August 18, 1997

During a hearing loss management workshop, 10 listeners with normal hearing sensitivity and 18 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss compared four group assistive listening devices (ALDs)—FM, induction loop, infrared, and soundfield amplification—to no system. Listeners with hearing loss were tested using the ALDs alone and using the ALDs inductively coupled to personal in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids. Significant improvements in word recognition ability with the FM, induction loop, and infrared systems were noted in listeners with normal hearing and with all ALD systems in listeners with hearing loss, as compared to performance with no system. Listeners with hearing loss performed better and preferred using the FM, induction loop, and infrared systems with headsets, but preferred the soundfield amplification system with their hearing aids. Both groups of listeners preferred the FM system over other systems in terms of performance, comfort, and ease of use.

Acknowledgments
This research was made possible by a Department of Veterans Affairs Predoctoral Fellowship awarded to the first author. Special thanks go to Mary Bauer at Starkey Laboratories Inc. for providing hearing aids for KEMAR; Jeff Anderson at Audio Enhancement for providing extra receivers; and Richard H. Wilson at the Mountain Home VAMC for providing equipment for use in the study and for helping with some of the figures for the manuscript.
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