The Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project Although the goal of early identification of infants with hearing loss has been advocated for more than 30 years (Downs & Sterritt, 1967), the national initiatives from the last 10 years have supported the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening programs. In 1990, the U.S. Department of Health and Human ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
The Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vickie Thomson, MA
    Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project, State Coordinator, Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South Denver, CO 80222-1530
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
The Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 74-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.74
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 74-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0603.74
Although the goal of early identification of infants with hearing loss has been advocated for more than 30 years (Downs & Sterritt, 1967), the national initiatives from the last 10 years have supported the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening programs. In 1990, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released the Healthy People 2000 initiative. Objective 17.6 of this document states, “By the year 2000, 90% of all children with a significant hearing impairment will be identified by 12 months of age.”
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1993 assembled a Consensus Conference on Early Identification of Hearing Impairment in Infants and Young Children. The expert panel developed a Consensus Statement recommending that universal hearing screening be implemented for all infants by 3 months of age. The Joint Committee on Infant Hearing released their Position Paper in 1994, also endorsing universal newborn hearing detection. In addition to these national endorsements, there has been the development of new technology: automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) and otoacoustic emissions (OAE). Newborn hearing screening is now a reality prior to hospital discharge.
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