Experience, Attitudes, and Competencies of Audiologic Support Personnel in a Rehabilitation Hospital The use of audiologic support personnel is not new to audiologists who have used the assistance of a variety of professionals in the establishment of hearing aid monitoring programs in several service delivery settings. For example, classroom teachers, speech-language pathologists, and nurses have participated in performing hearing instrument checks as ... Perspective
Perspective  |   October 01, 1998
Experience, Attitudes, and Competencies of Audiologic Support Personnel in a Rehabilitation Hospital
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carole E. Johnson
    Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5232
  • Sandra Clark-Lewis
    Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5232
  • Donna Griffin
    Independent Consultant, Montgomery, AL
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: johns19@mail.auburn.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Healthcare Settings / Perspectives
Perspective   |   October 01, 1998
Experience, Attitudes, and Competencies of Audiologic Support Personnel in a Rehabilitation Hospital
American Journal of Audiology, October 1998, Vol. 7, 26-31. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1998/020)
History: Received September 11, 1997 , Accepted May 1, 1998
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 1998, Vol. 7, 26-31. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1998/020)
History: Received September 11, 1997; Accepted May 1, 1998
The use of audiologic support personnel is not new to audiologists who have used the assistance of a variety of professionals in the establishment of hearing aid monitoring programs in several service delivery settings. For example, classroom teachers, speech-language pathologists, and nurses have participated in performing hearing instrument checks as part of comprehensive hearing aid and auditory trainer management programs in the schools (Musket, 1994). However, these professionals often have not had the necessary background to participate in such programs, requiring in-service training (Johnson, Stein, & Lass, 1992).
A rehabilitation hospital is another service delivery site in which the assistance of staff members is crucial in establishing adequate support programs for patients having hearing impairment. Admission to these hospitals occurs after some health crisis (e.g., cerebral vascular accident or traumatic accident), necessitating a stay at an acute care facility for stabilization, leaving little time for planning for patients’ everyday needs. Transition from the acute care center to the rehabilitation hospital does not always attend to those needs. Patients’ hearing loss often is not mentioned, is overlooked, or goes undetected. Even if patients’ hearing aids accompany them to the facility, they may not be able to manipulate and/or manage the devices due to difficulties with gross and/or fine motor skills. Without amplification, patients having hearing impairment may not be able to communicate with the professionals assisting them in overcoming their disability, which can impede their recovery.
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