Tympanometric Screening Norms for Adults The purpose of this study was to reexamine the Margolis and Heller (1987)  normative tympanometric data (also American Speech-Language-Hearing [ASHA], 1990  interim norms) using a strict control over subject age and gender. Normative values for peak, compensated static acoustic admittance (Peak Ytm), acoustic equivalent volume (Vea), and tympanometric width (TW) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Tympanometric Screening Norms for Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christina M. Roup
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706
  • Terry L. Wiley
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706
  • Staci H. Safady
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706
  • Daniel T. Stoppenbach
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Tympanometric Screening Norms for Adults
American Journal of Audiology, October 1998, Vol. 7, 55-60. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1998/014)
History: Received June 22, 1997 , Accepted March 4, 1998
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 1998, Vol. 7, 55-60. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1998/014)
History: Received June 22, 1997; Accepted March 4, 1998

The purpose of this study was to reexamine the Margolis and Heller (1987)  normative tympanometric data (also American Speech-Language-Hearing [ASHA], 1990  interim norms) using a strict control over subject age and gender. Normative values for peak, compensated static acoustic admittance (Peak Ytm), acoustic equivalent volume (Vea), and tympanometric width (TW) were determined for 102 young adults with normal hearing. Relative to the Margolis and Heller normative values, significant differences were found for Vea and TW. Although statistically significant, these differences were small and of little clinical importance. However, significant and clinically important gender differences in young adults were observed for each of the tympanometric measures. Compared to males, females had lower Peak Ytm values, smaller Vea values, and higher TW values.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Education Training Grant #H029D40085. The authors would especially like to thank Robert Margolis for sharing the raw data from the Margolis and Heller (1987)  study. Portions of this work were presented at the 1996 meeting of the American Academy of Audiology in Salt Lake City, UT, April 20, 1996.
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