Measurements of Loudness Growth in 1/2-Octave Bands for Children and Adults With Normal Hearing The loudness growth in 1/2-octave bands (LGOB) procedure has been shown previously to provide valid estimates of loudness growth for adults with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (Allen, Hall, & Jeng, 1990), and it has been widely incorporated into fitting strategies for adult hearing aid users by a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
Measurements of Loudness Growth in 1/2-Octave Bands for Children and Adults With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melisa R. Ellis
    Department of Otolaryngology, Fairview University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Michael K. Wynne
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Barnhill Road, Room 0860, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5230
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mwynne@iupui.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
Measurements of Loudness Growth in 1/2-Octave Bands for Children and Adults With Normal Hearing
American Journal of Audiology, June 1999, Vol. 8, 40-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/008)
History: Received March 5, 1998 , Accepted March 16, 1999
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 1999, Vol. 8, 40-46. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/008)
History: Received March 5, 1998; Accepted March 16, 1999

The loudness growth in 1/2-octave bands (LGOB) procedure has been shown previously to provide valid estimates of loudness growth for adults with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (Allen, Hall, & Jeng, 1990), and it has been widely incorporated into fitting strategies for adult hearing aid users by a hearing aid manufacturer. Here, we applied a simple modification of LGOB to children and adults with normal hearing and then compared the loudness growth functions (as obtained from end-point data) between the two age groups. In addition, reliability data obtained within a single session and between test sessions were compared between the two groups. Large differences were observed in the means between the two groups for the lower boundary values, the upper boundary values, and the range between boundaries both within and across all frequencies. The data obtained from children also had greater variance than the adult data. In addition, there was more variability in the data across test sessions for children. Many test-retest differences for children exceeded 10 dB. Adult test-retest differences were generally less than 10 dB. Although the LGOB with the modifications used in this study may be used to measure loudness growth in children, its poor reliability with this age group may limit its clinical use for children with hearing loss. Additional work is needed to explore whether loudness growth measures can be adapted successfully to children and whether these measures contribute worthwhile information for fitting hearing aids to children.

Acknowledgments
This research was conducted while the first author was a graduate student at Indiana University. The manuscript benefited from the thorough and insightful comments provided by Wayne Olsen, Todd Fortune, and one anonymous reviewer. Portions of this paper were presented at the Student Research Forum at the 1997 Annual Convention of the American Academy of Audiology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access