A Clinical Trial of the ReSound IC4 Hearing Device A manufacturer-sponsored clinical trial was conducted of ReSound Corporation's IC4 hearing device (HD), an in-the-ear application of their two-channel, fast-acting, widedynamic range compression sound processor. This study was a follow-up to an earlier clinical trial of ReSound's behind-the-ear version of the same sound processor, the BT2 Personal Hearing System (Walden, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1999
A Clinical Trial of the ReSound IC4 Hearing Device
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001
  • Rauna K. Surr
    Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001
  • Mary T. Cord
    Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001
  • Chaslav V. Pavlovic
    ReSound Corporation, Redwood City, CA
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1999
A Clinical Trial of the ReSound IC4 Hearing Device
American Journal of Audiology, June 1999, Vol. 8, 65-78. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/010)
History: Received October 23, 1998 , Accepted March 2, 1999
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 1999, Vol. 8, 65-78. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/010)
History: Received October 23, 1998; Accepted March 2, 1999

A manufacturer-sponsored clinical trial was conducted of ReSound Corporation's IC4 hearing device (HD), an in-the-ear application of their two-channel, fast-acting, widedynamic range compression sound processor. This study was a follow-up to an earlier clinical trial of ReSound's behind-the-ear version of the same sound processor, the BT2 Personal Hearing System (Walden, B. E., Surr, R. K., Cord, M. T., & Pavlovic, C. V. (1998). A clinical trial of the ReSound BT2 Personal Hearing System. American Journal of Audiology, 7, 85–100). Forty adult males with gradually sloping, moderate sensorineural hearing losses participated. All were experienced hearing aid users who wore linear Class D instruments with input compression limiting at the time of their enrollment in this study. The Connected Speech Test, presented at several presentation levels and under various conditions of signal degradation, and the scales and subscales of the Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit were used to evaluate hearing aid performance and benefit under four relatively independent prototype listening situations (Walden, B. E., Demorest, M. E., & Hepler, E. L. (1984). Self-report approach to assessing benefit derived from amplification. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 27, 49–56). Aided performance with the IC4 HD was compared with (a) unaided performance, (b) performance of persons with normal hearing, and (c) performance with linear amplification. Participants with hearing loss obtained significant benefit from the IC4 HD, although IC4-aided performance remained well below that of unaided performance of persons with normal hearing, especially on laboratory measures of speech recognition. Furthermore, small mean performance advantages were observed for the IC4 HD compared to linear hearing aids, although there was substantial variability across participants. Finally, when given a choice to either purchase the IC4 HD at a discount from the manufacturer or continue using their own government-issued linear hearing aids, the majority of the participants chose to purchase the IC4 HD.

Acknowledgments
This work was sponsored by ReSound Corporation, Redwood City, CA, through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Clinical Investigation Regulatory Office, United States Army Medical Department, Ft. Sam Houston, TX. Additional support was received from the Department of Clinical Investigation, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, under Work Unit 2554. The opinions and assertions presented are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as necessarily reflecting the views of the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense, or ReSound Corporation.
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