Head Trauma and Mid-Frequency Hearing Loss Numerous reports in the literature associate head trauma with high-frequency hearing losses, often mimicking "4K notches" attributed to noise exposure. We have observed that some patients with a positive history for head trauma may show midfrequency notches in their audiometric configurations. ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   December 01, 1999
Head Trauma and Mid-Frequency Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alison M. Scott
    Section of Audiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Christopher D. Bauch
    Section of Audiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Wayne O. Olsen
    Section of Audiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: bauch.christopher@mayo.edu
  • Presently at Division of Audiology, Carle Clinic Association, Urbana, IL 61801.
    Presently at Division of Audiology, Carle Clinic Association, Urbana, IL 61801.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   December 01, 1999
Head Trauma and Mid-Frequency Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, December 1999, Vol. 8, 101-105. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/020)
History: Received December 1, 1997 , Accepted September 2, 1999
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 1999, Vol. 8, 101-105. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/020)
History: Received December 1, 1997; Accepted September 2, 1999

Numerous reports in the literature associate head trauma with high-frequency hearing losses, often mimicking "4K notches" attributed to noise exposure. We have observed that some patients with a positive history for head trauma may show midfrequency notches in their audiometric configurations.

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