Implications From Factor Analysis for Central Auditory Processing Disorders Central auditory processing disorders among school-age children have been challenging to identify and treat. Many issues remain that need to be resolved. Here, we compare and contrast findings on 331 school-age children who were given two of the more common central auditory processing disorder tests (Staggered Spondaic Word [SSW] Test ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Implications From Factor Analysis for Central Auditory Processing Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald L. Schow
    Box 8116, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209
  • Gail Chermak
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: schorona@isu.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Implications From Factor Analysis for Central Auditory Processing Disorders
American Journal of Audiology, December 1999, Vol. 8, 137-142. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/012)
History: Received July 17, 1998 , Accepted March 2, 1999
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 1999, Vol. 8, 137-142. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(1999/012)
History: Received July 17, 1998; Accepted March 2, 1999

Central auditory processing disorders among school-age children have been challenging to identify and treat. Many issues remain that need to be resolved. Here, we compare and contrast findings on 331 school-age children who were given two of the more common central auditory processing disorder tests (Staggered Spondaic Word [SSW] Test and the SCAN Screening Test for Auditory Processing Disorders). These results replicate and reinforce many of the psychometric findings reported earlier. The use of factor analysis with these test results was explored. Significantly, two factors emerged, including an auditory binaural separation from competition factor and a monaural low redundancy degradation factor. These findings help us define the nature of processes probed by the SCAN screening test and the SSW test. Furthermore, these findings clarify the use of SSW and SCAN because they showed both SSW Left Competing and Right Competing loading within the same factor, whereas the three subtests on SCAN sorted into two rather than three factors.

Acknowledgments
We express appreciation to Mark Vause, school audiologist, and to the public schools of Boise, ID, for cooperating with us to make the basic data available for analysis. Their generous support was invaluable. We also thank Tracie Radford, Nancy Grahl, and Matt Newman for their assistance in gathering the data and in preparing this report. Matthew Bernt and Terry Peterson provided expert assistance in the use of factor analysis, and their contribution is acknowledged and appreciated.
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