A New CAPD Battery—Multiple Auditory Processing Assessment Factor Analysis and Comparisons with SCAN Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2000
A New CAPD Battery—Multiple Auditory Processing Assessment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah M. Domitz
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Ronald L. Schow
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
    Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Schorona@isu.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2000
A New CAPD Battery—Multiple Auditory Processing Assessment
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 101-111. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/012)
History: Received October 25, 1999 , Accepted June 1, 2000
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 101-111. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/012)
History: Received October 25, 1999; Accepted June 1, 2000

Based on recommendations by Musiek & Chermak (1994, American Journal of Audiology, 3, 23–27) and ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54), a battery of four commonly used tests was selected and recorded for use in assessing school children. These tests were labeled the Multiple Auditory Processing Assessment (MAPA) and then administered to an initial sample of 81 third grade children, along with the SCAN screening test for auditory processing disorders. Afterward, several exploratory factor analyses were performed on the findings, and comparisons were made between the results for the MAPA and SCAN. Four separate factors emerged from the four MAPA tests, which were linked closely to the components of central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs) defined by ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54). These factors were labeled monaural separation/closure (MSC), auditory pattern/temporal ordering, binaural integration, and binaural separation (BS). SCAN appears to measure two of these factors, MSC and BS. Use of MAPA is encouraging. Our findings suggest it may provide an appropriate multiple-test, CAPD battery for third grade children, and it meets at least some of the objectives described in the consensus document proposed by ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54).

Acknowledgments
This work was originally completed by the first author in a thesis as part of a master’s degree program at Idaho State University, with the second author serving as major advisor. Gail Chermak has been extremely generous with her support, insight, and encouragement from the inception to the completion of the work. Frank Musiek, Jack Willeford, and Bill Carver granted permission for the use of tests for which they hold exclusive rights. Jeff Brockett and Bill Carver helped perfect the CD recording used herein. Thayne Smedley, Tony Seikel, and Mark Roberts offered helpful advice and input. Mary Whitaker, school audiologist, the Pocatello School District administration, three elementary schools, and their teachers and staffs were generous in helping us locate the willing children who gave their time and attention to this project. Matt Berent and Teri Peterson rendered invaluable assistance with the statistics used herein. To everyone who helped so generously we offer our grateful, heartfelt thanks.
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