Outcome of Newborn Hearing Screening by ABR Compared With Four Different DPOAE Pass Criteria The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness and utility of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing as screening methodologies suitable for universal application at a large birthing hospital. Five hundred sixty-nine neonates (1184 ears) without risk indicators for hearing loss underwent ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2000
Outcome of Newborn Hearing Screening by ABR Compared With Four Different DPOAE Pass Criteria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan E. Barker
    The University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor
  • Marci M. Lesperance
    The University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor
  • Paul R. Kileny, PhD
    The University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor
    Division of Audiology & Electrophysiology, University of Michigan Health System, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, TC 1904, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0312
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2000
Outcome of Newborn Hearing Screening by ABR Compared With Four Different DPOAE Pass Criteria
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 142-148. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/017)
History: Received July 13, 2000 , Accepted October 10, 2000
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 142-148. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/017)
History: Received July 13, 2000; Accepted October 10, 2000

The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness and utility of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing as screening methodologies suitable for universal application at a large birthing hospital. Five hundred sixty-nine neonates (1184 ears) without risk indicators for hearing loss underwent DPOAE and ABR screening before hospital discharge at birth. All ears (100%) passed the ABR screening. DPOAE results were categorized on the basis of the number of frequencies at which emissions were obtained as well as presence versus absence of a replicated response at each test frequency. Pass and refer rates varied widely, on the basis of whether the presence of DPOAE response at 2000 Hz or replication were required. With the most stringent criteria, only 64.44% of ears passed, whereas with the least stringent criteria 88.94% passed. Given that 100% of ears passed according to the gold standard of the ABR screening, these results indicate false-positive rates ranging from 11% to 35% by DPOAE screening. This discrepancy in pass and refer rates when various criteria are applied indicates the need for standardization and further comparison of appropriate pass criteria for newborn hearing screening programs.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank The Carls Foundation for their generous support of this project. Abreena Tlumak is acknowledged for assistance with data analysis.
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