Central Auditory Processes and Test Measures ASHA 1996 Revisited Perspective
Perspective  |   December 01, 2000
Central Auditory Processes and Test Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald L. Schow
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
    Idaho State University, 650 Memorial Drive, Pocatello, ID 83209
  • J. Anthony Seikel
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Gail D. Chermak
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Matthew Berent
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: schorona@isu.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / ASHA News & Member Stories / Language Disorders / Perspectives
Perspective   |   December 01, 2000
Central Auditory Processes and Test Measures
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 63-68. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/013)
History: Received October 25, 1999 , Accepted June 1, 2000
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 63-68. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/013)
History: Received October 25, 1999; Accepted June 1, 2000

The theoretical issues surrounding central auditory processing disorders (CAPD) are reviewed here, especially with reference to the central auditory behavioral processes and the auditory test measures as prescribed in the ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54) statement on CAPD. A simplified nomenclature is recommended that directly relates process and test measure to facilitate the diagnostic process in CAPD. This new terminology closely follows the ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54) document, but provides some refinement based on recent research in CAPD. To support this recommendation, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was applied to the findings of Domitz and Schow (2000, American Journal of Audiology who proposed use of a battery of CAPD tests, the Multiple Auditory Processing Assessment (MAPA) for testing school children. The CFA was found to reinforce the four-factor model, which clearly emerged in the exploratory factor analysis of Domitz and Schow. The model was found to be reasonably consistent even when subtests from the SCAN were included in the analysis. Refinement and revision of ASHA (1996, American Journal of Audiology, 5(2), 41–54) is recommended to facilitate diagnosis, subclassification, and intervention for CAPD.

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