Celebrating a Decade of Evaluation and Treatment The University of Maryland Tinnitus & Hyperacusis Center Clinical Focus: Site Visit
Clinical Focus: Site Visit  |   December 01, 2000
Celebrating a Decade of Evaluation and Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan L. Gold
    University of Maryland Tinnitus & Hyperacusis Center, 419 West Redwood Street, Suite 370, Baltimore, MD 21201
  • Craig Formby
    University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
  • William C. Gray
    University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus / Site Visit
Clinical Focus: Site Visit   |   December 01, 2000
Celebrating a Decade of Evaluation and Treatment
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 69-74. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/014)
History: Received March 23, 2000 , Accepted May 20, 2000
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2000, Vol. 9, 69-74. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2000/014)
History: Received March 23, 2000; Accepted May 20, 2000

The University of Maryland Tinnitus & Hyperacusis Center in Baltimore was the first center in the United States dedicated to the evaluation and treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis patients implementing an habituation-based protocol that has become known internationally as Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT). A crucial feature of the model is the postulate that a number of systems in the brain are involved in the emergence of tinnitus. The cochlea and auditory periphery play only a secondary role. To facilitate the goal of habituation of the tinnitus signal, TRT implements both directive counseling to neutralize the negative emotional associations toward the tinnitus, and sound therapy to interfere with the signal. As an outgrowth of the work with tinnitus, the evaluation and treatment of hyperacusis has emerged as an increasingly important part of our program. This report describes the unique facility, staff, and services of the Center as we celebrate a decade of research and clinical management dedicated to the scientific understanding of tinnitus and hyperacusis.

Acknowledgment
Preparation of this report was supported, in part, by NIH award 1R21DC 04514 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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