Effects of Providing and Withholding Postfitting Fine-Tuning Adjustments on Outcome Measures in Novice Hearing Aid Users A Pilot Study Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Providing and Withholding Postfitting Fine-Tuning Adjustments on Outcome Measures in Novice Hearing Aid Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David R. Cunningham
    Health Sciences Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
  • Kristie J. Williams
    Health Sciences Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
  • L. Jane Goldsmith
    Department of Family Medicine and Information Technology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Providing and Withholding Postfitting Fine-Tuning Adjustments on Outcome Measures in Novice Hearing Aid Users
American Journal of Audiology, June 2001, Vol. 10, 13-23. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/001)
History: Received December 28, 1999 , Accepted December 8, 2000
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2001, Vol. 10, 13-23. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/001)
History: Received December 28, 1999; Accepted December 8, 2000

This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of either providing or withholding subject-driven, postfitting electroacoustic changes (fine tuning) on hearing aid performance as measured by tests of speech recognition in noise, sound quality, and benefit. A group of adult first-time hearing aid users with moderate, high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss was studied over a 5-month postfitting period. Half of the group served as a control group; half constituted the treatment group. Treatment consisted of making as many postfitting electroacoustic manipulations as the participants' complaints/observations required. These adjustments were withheld from the control group individuals. Group performance differences were assessed using the COSI, two versions of the APHAB, a Satisfaction scale, a Sound Quality tool, and the SIN test. Analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in the control and treatment groups' performances or perceived benefit at any of the five postfitting test sessions. These data suggested that there was no measurable advantage to be derived from making postfitting frequency-gain adjustments of 10 dB or less to hearing aids with wide dynamic range compression fitted in the manner described in this article. Definitive studies of the effects of postfitting electroacoustic fine tuning must be undertaken.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access