Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Past, Present, and Future Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • George T. Mencher
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, Institute of Hearing Research, Nottingham University, United Kingdom
  • Adrian C. Davis
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, Institute of Hearing Research, Nottingham University, United Kingdom
  • Shirley J. DeVoe
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, Institute of Hearing Research, Nottingham University, United Kingdom
  • Dee Beresford
    MRC Institute of Hearing Research, Institute of Hearing Research, Nottingham University, United Kingdom
  • John M. Bamford
    Centre for Human Communication and Deafness, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mencher@is.dal.ca
  • Currently affiliated with the School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Currently affiliated with the School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Canada.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening
American Journal of Audiology, June 2001, Vol. 10, 3-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/002)
History: Received August 14, 2000 , Accepted March 21, 2001
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2001, Vol. 10, 3-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/002)
History: Received August 14, 2000; Accepted March 21, 2001

After a brief review of the history of newborn hearing screening including the Downs behavioral testing procedure, the Crib-o-gram and similar devices, and the use of auropalpebral reflex and otoacoustic emissions, there is a discussion of key issues that need to be resolved before universal hearing screening is introduced. Included are questions regarding the target population(s) of screening programs, well baby versus NICU screening, dealing with false-positives and the effects on parent-child relationships, and finally, the availability of resources for screening and follow-up. The results of a recent study in the United Kingdom that assessed the current state of audiology services and found there is a difference between existing standards and what is actually being done in practice, are presented and considered in terms of current trends in the United States to move ahead with universal screening without a solid database of information regarding the preparedness of clinical centers to deal with the need for services that will result from the initiation of universal programs. Caution is urged.

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