Evidence in Support of a Different Model of Universal Newborn Hearing Loss Identification We share our colleagues’ goals of early detection of hearing impairment in infancy followed by timely and appropriate intervention. The positive effects of early detection and intervention for hearing loss on intellectual and academic development are undeniable. We also agree with our colleagues that it is important to undertake and ... Face-to-Face
Face-to-Face  |   December 01, 2001
Evidence in Support of a Different Model of Universal Newborn Hearing Loss Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul R. Kileny, PhD
    University of Michigan Health System, Division of Audiology and Electrophysiology, 1300 East Medical Center Drive, TC1904, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
  • Marci M. Lesperance
    University of Michigan Health System, Division of Audiology and Electrophysiology, 1300 East Medical Center Drive, TC1904, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Face-to-Face
Face-to-Face   |   December 01, 2001
Evidence in Support of a Different Model of Universal Newborn Hearing Loss Identification
American Journal of Audiology, December 2001, Vol. 10, 65-67. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/014)
History: Received June 18, 2001 , Accepted September 21, 2001
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2001, Vol. 10, 65-67. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/014)
History: Received June 18, 2001; Accepted September 21, 2001
We share our colleagues’ goals of early detection of hearing impairment in infancy followed by timely and appropriate intervention. The positive effects of early detection and intervention for hearing loss on intellectual and academic development are undeniable. We also agree with our colleagues that it is important to undertake and implement nationwide programs for early detection of hearing loss. We believe, however, that as attractive and straightforward as it may appear, universal hearing screening is not necessarily synonymous with universal detection of hearing impairment, and that experts may differ in their professional opinion as how best to achieve this goal. We would also like to make the point that whether one does or does not fully embrace the concept of universal hearing screening, without a well educated and knowledgeable cadre of primary health-care providers such as pediatricians, family practitioners, and pediatric nurse practitioners, the goal of universal detection of hearing impairment cannot be met. If the goal of educating primary care providers is achieved, a cost-effective yet comprehensive approach to universal detection of hearing impairment may be nationally implemented. We would like to emphasize that our respective approaches to universal detection of hearing impairment are not exclusionary (as some may claim) but potentially complementary. We propose a rational, nonpartisan, and achievable model to deal with the important problem of hearing loss in infancy.
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