Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants The physiologic basis for cochlear and brainstem implants is discussed. It is concluded that the success of cochlear implants may be explained by assuming that the auditory system can adequately discriminate complex sounds, such as speech sounds, on the basis of their temporal structure when that is encoded in a ... Short Course
Short Course  |   December 01, 2001
Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aage R. Møller
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, School of Human Development, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: amoller@UTDALLAS.EDU
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Short Course
Short Course   |   December 01, 2001
Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants
American Journal of Audiology, December 2001, Vol. 10, 68-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/012)
History: Received March 6, 2001 , Accepted September 7, 2001
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2001, Vol. 10, 68-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2001/012)
History: Received March 6, 2001; Accepted September 7, 2001

The physiologic basis for cochlear and brainstem implants is discussed. It is concluded that the success of cochlear implants may be explained by assuming that the auditory system can adequately discriminate complex sounds, such as speech sounds, on the basis of their temporal structure when that is encoded in a few separate frequency bands to offer moderate separation of spectral components. The most important roles of the cochlea seems to be to prepare complex sounds for temporal analysis and to create separate channels through which information in different frequency bands is transmitted separately to higher nervous centers for decoding of temporal information. It is then pertinent to ask how many channels are needed. Because speech discrimination is very important, it is probably sufficient to use enough channels to separate formants from each other.

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