Evaluating the Benefit of Speech Recoding Hearing Aids in Children Children with significant high-frequency hearing loss may be difficult to fit with hearing aids using conventional amplification. Frequency-lowering hearing aids using dynamic speech recoding (DSR) technology have been proposed as a possible means to achieve full speech audibility. The current study investigated 78 children from ages 1.3 to 21.6 years ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2003
Evaluating the Benefit of Speech Recoding Hearing Aids in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Denise R. Miller-Hansen, PhD
    Children’s Mercy Hospital, Hearing and Speech Department, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO 64108
  • Peggy B. Nelson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Judith E. Widen
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Stephen D. Simon
    Children’s Mercy Hospital, Hearing and Speech Department, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO 64108
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dmiller@cmh.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2003
Evaluating the Benefit of Speech Recoding Hearing Aids in Children
American Journal of Audiology, December 2003, Vol. 12, 106-113. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/018)
History: Received December 4, 2002 , Accepted July 9, 2003
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2003, Vol. 12, 106-113. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/018)
History: Received December 4, 2002; Accepted July 9, 2003

Children with significant high-frequency hearing loss may be difficult to fit with hearing aids using conventional amplification. Frequency-lowering hearing aids using dynamic speech recoding (DSR) technology have been proposed as a possible means to achieve full speech audibility. The current study investigated 78 children from ages 1.3 to 21.6 years (M = 10.6 years) who wore DSR hearing aids. These hearing aids provided significant improvements in pure-tone average (PTA; mean improvement for the aided versus unaided condition of 49 dB) and high-frequency PTA (mean improvement for the aided versus unaided condition of 56 dB). A subgroup of 19 children were previous users of conventional hearing aids. These participants demonstrated a mean improvement of 11 dB in PTA and 12.5% in word recognition scores for DSR versus conventional amplification. However, DSR hearing aids required repair 3 times as often as conventional hearing aids. The greatest benefit was observed in children whose word recognition scores were poorest using conventional hearing aids.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the following audiologists: Lisa Butler, Joey Coleman, Kristie Kilkenny, Denise Kornfeind, Amy Lane, Loree Martin, Allison Merriott, and Ashleigh Redding.
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