Article  |   December 2003
Evaluating the Benefit of Speech Recoding Hearing Aids in Children
Author Notes
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   December 2003
Evaluating the Benefit of Speech Recoding Hearing Aids in Children
American Journal of Audiology December 2003, Vol.12, 106-113. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/018)
History: Accepted 09 Jul 2003 , Received 04 Dec 2002
American Journal of Audiology December 2003, Vol.12, 106-113. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/018)
History: Accepted 09 Jul 2003 , Received 04 Dec 2002

Children with significant high-frequency hearing loss may be difficult to fit with hearing aids using conventional amplification. Frequency-lowering hearing aids using dynamic speech recoding (DSR) technology have been proposed as a possible means to achieve full speech audibility. The current study investigated 78 children from ages 1.3 to 21.6 years (M = 10.6 years) who wore DSR hearing aids. These hearing aids provided significant improvements in pure-tone average (PTA; mean improvement for the aided versus unaided condition of 49 dB) and high-frequency PTA (mean improvement for the aided versus unaided condition of 56 dB). A subgroup of 19 children were previous users of conventional hearing aids. These participants demonstrated a mean improvement of 11 dB in PTA and 12.5% in word recognition scores for DSR versus conventional amplification. However, DSR hearing aids required repair 3 times as often as conventional hearing aids. The greatest benefit was observed in children whose word recognition scores were poorest using conventional hearing aids.

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