Editorial Am I an audiologist? I was fortunate to have attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison for my graduate education in audiology. After earning my master’s degree, I started the PhD program in audiology while doing my CFY at the VA hospital. The faculty in Communicative Disorders and Sciences at Madison encourage ... Editorial
Editorial  |   December 01, 2003
Editorial
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   December 01, 2003
Editorial
American Journal of Audiology, December 2003, Vol. 12, 58. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/010)
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2003, Vol. 12, 58. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2003/010)
Am I an audiologist? I was fortunate to have attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison for my graduate education in audiology. After earning my master’s degree, I started the PhD program in audiology while doing my CFY at the VA hospital. The faculty in Communicative Disorders and Sciences at Madison encourage the doctoral students to take coursework outside the discipline. I was no exception, and I found myself taking coursework in related disciplines, including neuroscience. Further, I was fortunate to work in the laboratory of a pediatric neurologist named Kurt Hecox, who eventually became my advisor. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) was, at that time, a hot area of investigation, both scientifically and clinically. My research was not what would commonly be considered clinical research, but rather investigated some of the basic stimulus dependencies of the ABR. My postdoctoral research and my work as a junior faculty member was predominantly animal research, and hence this work could hardly be described as clinical research. Recently, I’ve done some human work in such areas as aging and functional imaging, looking at age-related changes in ABRs, and in positron emission tomography in people with tinnitus. I am getting interested in the area of balance and its disorders. I guess I have come full circle: I started out in the clinical arena of audiology, then did predominantly nonclinical research for well over a decade, but now find that my research interests have become more clinical. The real advantage of an academic career is that such changes are not just tolerated, they are encouraged.
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