Factors that Allow a High Level of Speech Understanding by Patients Fit With Cochlear Implants Three factors account for the high level of speech understanding in quiet enjoyed by many patients fit with cochlear implants. First, some information about speech exists in the time/amplitude envelope of speech. This information is sufficient to narrow the number of word candidates for a given signal. Second, if information ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   December 01, 2002
Factors that Allow a High Level of Speech Understanding by Patients Fit With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael F. Dorman
    Arizona State University, Tempe; and University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City
  • Philipos C. Loizou
    University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson
  • Anthony J. Spahr
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Erin Maloff
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mdorman@asu.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Supplement: Implantable Hearing Device Symposium
Supplement Article   |   December 01, 2002
Factors that Allow a High Level of Speech Understanding by Patients Fit With Cochlear Implants
American Journal of Audiology, December 2002, Vol. 11, 119-123. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2002/014)
History: Received August 29, 2002 , Accepted November 15, 2002
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2002, Vol. 11, 119-123. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2002/014)
History: Received August 29, 2002; Accepted November 15, 2002

Three factors account for the high level of speech understanding in quiet enjoyed by many patients fit with cochlear implants. First, some information about speech exists in the time/amplitude envelope of speech. This information is sufficient to narrow the number of word candidates for a given signal. Second, if information from the envelope of speech is available to listeners, then only minimal information from the frequency domain is necessary for high levels of speech recognition in quiet. Third, perceiving strategies for speech are inherently flexible in terms of the mapping between signal frequencies (i.e., the locations of the formants) and phonetic identity.

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