The Tuning Curve in Clinical Audiology This article will explore the audiograms formed by the expected psychophysical thresholds from single, normally functioning inner hair cells. Like the audiogram formed by the vibrotactile response region, these psychophysical tuning curves represent fundamental limits in audiometry since they are the worst possible thresholds expected, even if no other cells ... Short Course
Short Course  |   December 01, 2002
The Tuning Curve in Clinical Audiology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chris Halpin
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Short Course
Short Course   |   December 01, 2002
The Tuning Curve in Clinical Audiology
American Journal of Audiology, December 2002, Vol. 11, 56-64. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2002/016)
History: Received June 25, 2002 , Accepted November 26, 2002
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2002, Vol. 11, 56-64. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2002/016)
History: Received June 25, 2002; Accepted November 26, 2002

This article will explore the audiograms formed by the expected psychophysical thresholds from single, normally functioning inner hair cells. Like the audiogram formed by the vibrotactile response region, these psychophysical tuning curves represent fundamental limits in audiometry since they are the worst possible thresholds expected, even if no other cells are functioning. These examples can be put to many uses, but the most important lesson of the hypothetical tuning curve audiogram is that whereas each cell gives rise to thresholds across many frequencies, it cannot be expected to transmit more than one cell's worth of speech information. In the clinic, this means that even when many frequencies respond on the audiogram, there may be a much more restricted set of actual cells remaining in the cochlea, and only these remaining cells will respond, for example, to hearing aids.

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