Paper  |   December 2004
Genetics Content in the Graduate Audiology Curriculum
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training
Paper   |   December 2004
Genetics Content in the Graduate Audiology Curriculum
American Journal of Audiology, December 2004, Vol. 13, 126-134. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/017)
History: Received June 9, 2004 , Accepted August 14, 2004
American Journal of Audiology, December 2004, Vol. 13, 126-134. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/017)
History: Received June 9, 2004; Accepted August 14, 2004

Astounding progress has been made in the identification and characterization of genes for hearing loss, which has led to an increasing role of genetics evaluation and testing in the diagnostic process for children with hearing loss. The importance of health professionals such as audiologists gaining core competencies in genetics has been recognized. The current report describes a survey of academic programs in audiology designed to determine the extent to which genetics content is included in the curriculum. Responses from 56% of existing academic programs indicate that 95% include some genetics content in their programs, with the total number of classroom hours ranging from 2 to 65. Most programs included information on basic genetic mechanisms, syndromes, and interpreting family history information, while many fewer reported covering the molecular basis of hearing loss, genetic testing, or ethical or legal issues. The results of this survey demonstrate the need to incorporate more genetics content into audiology curricula and suggest strategies for assisting audiology faculty with this process.

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