Effects of Test Order on Most Comfortable and Uncomfortable Loudness Levels for Speech This study examined test-order effects on most comfortable loudness (MCL) and uncomfortable loudness (UCL) levels for spondaic words in 2 groups of 30 normal hearing listeners each. For Group 1, MCL was measured first, followed by UCL. For Group 2, UCL was measured first, and then MCL. A retest was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2004
Effects of Test Order on Most Comfortable and Uncomfortable Loudness Levels for Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerry Punch, PhD
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1212
  • Brad Rakerd
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Antony Joseph
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jpunch@msu.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2004
Effects of Test Order on Most Comfortable and Uncomfortable Loudness Levels for Speech
American Journal of Audiology, December 2004, Vol. 13, 158-163. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/020)
History: Received March 31, 2004 , Accepted April 27, 2004
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2004, Vol. 13, 158-163. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/020)
History: Received March 31, 2004; Accepted April 27, 2004

This study examined test-order effects on most comfortable loudness (MCL) and uncomfortable loudness (UCL) levels for spondaic words in 2 groups of 30 normal hearing listeners each. For Group 1, MCL was measured first, followed by UCL. For Group 2, UCL was measured first, and then MCL. A retest was conducted for both groups. Results showed that MCL was significantly elevated for Group 2, but not for Group 1. There was no effect on UCL for either group. In a follow-up experiment, the magnitude of the test-order effect on MCL increased significantly when MCL measurements followed UCL measurements closely in time. These results argue for management of the ordering and temporal spacing of MCL and UCL testing in clinical loudness measurements.

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