Editorial In an effort to promote research in the profession, ASHA sent out a notice about the 2005 Students Preparing for Academic & Research Careers awards to the membership. In this announcement, it was stated that these awards were to provide research funding to those pursuing undergraduate, master’s, or doctor of ... Editorial
Editorial  |   June 01, 2005
Editorial
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   June 01, 2005
Editorial
American Journal of Audiology, June 2005, Vol. 14, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2005/001)
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2005, Vol. 14, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2005/001)
In an effort to promote research in the profession, ASHA sent out a notice about the 2005 Students Preparing for Academic & Research Careers awards to the membership. In this announcement, it was stated that these awards were to provide research funding to those pursuing undergraduate, master’s, or doctor of audiology (AuD) degrees. This led to some comments on ASHA’s audiology e-mail list. There were comments from those holding the PhD stating that ASHA should provide such research support for those pursuing a research degree, the PhD, as the AuD is not a research degree. Several folks holding the AuD responded that they do, in fact, engage in research. This was followed by a statement that audiologists holding academic positions should have a PhD, rather than an AuD. One e-mail that followed included an implied homology between those holding the AuD and those holding an MD, in terms of their role in academia. At least one e-mail in this thread made rather negative comments about the clinical and teaching skills of academic audiologists.
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