Recognition of Hearing Aid Orientation Content by First-Time Users Purpose: To examine how well hearing aid orientation (HAO) content is remembered immediately and 1 month after the HAO, and whether the ability to remember this information differs as a function of the audiologist providing the information, patient’s age, degree of hearing loss, and prior knowledge of hearing aids. Method: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2005
Recognition of Hearing Aid Orientation Content by First-Time Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith L. Reese
    James A. Haley Veterans Affairs Hospital, Tampa, FL, and University of South Florida, Tampa
    James A. Haley VA Hospital, (ASP 126), 13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612
  • Theresa Hnath-Chisolm
    University of South Florida, Tampa, and Bay Pines Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2005
Recognition of Hearing Aid Orientation Content by First-Time Users
American Journal of Audiology, June 2005, Vol. 14, 94-104. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2005/009)
History: Received October 1, 2004 , Revised April 6, 2005 , Accepted May 25, 2005
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2005, Vol. 14, 94-104. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2005/009)
History: Received October 1, 2004; Revised April 6, 2005; Accepted May 25, 2005

Purpose: To examine how well hearing aid orientation (HAO) content is remembered immediately and 1 month after the HAO, and whether the ability to remember this information differs as a function of the audiologist providing the information, patient’s age, degree of hearing loss, and prior knowledge of hearing aids.

Method: A convenience sample of 100 older adults completed a multiple-choice test of hearing aid knowledge immediately following the HAO and 1 month later. Covariate and regression analyses were used to address the study purpose.

Results: On average, participants recognized 74% of the information immediately following HAO and 78% at 1 month. Hearing loss was associated with declining recognition for hearing aid use and care information immediately following HAO, whereas prior knowledge was associated with successful recognition. Participants who recognized more HAO content immediately also remembered more at 1 month. A difference in recognition of hearing aid information based on audiologist was suggested immediately following HAO, but there were no differences at 1 month. Ability to recognize HAO content was not related to age of participants.

Conclusions: On average, participants recognized approximately 75% of the HAO content, which is encouraging from a clinical standpoint, providing support for the efficacy of the HAO and the time audiologists spend in completing it. Moreover, recognition of HAO content improved when tested at 1 month, suggesting audiologists may expect their patients to be aware of a majority of hearing aid use and care information following the hearing aid trial period.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge Cathy McEvoy, PhD, for the contribution of her expertise in the area of aging and memory to the development of this study. We thank Harvey Abrams, PhD, and John Berardino, AuD, chiefs of the clinics where data was gathered, and their staff members who assisted with the development of the HAKI and supported the study procedures. The help of Peg Aurilio and Chelby Cavalero in data gathering is greatly appreciated. Portions of this article were presented at the Hearing Rehabilitation Foundation Aural Rehabilitation Conference in Portland, ME, in May 2001, and were printed in the proceedings of that meeting. Portions of this article were also presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention in Washington, DC, in November 2000. This work was completed in partial fulfillment of the PhD in psychology for the first author.
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