Article  |   June 2004
Speech Perception by Students With Cochlear Implants Using Sound-Field Systems in Classrooms
 
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Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / School-Based Settings
Article   |   June 2004
Speech Perception by Students With Cochlear Implants Using Sound-Field Systems in Classrooms
American Journal of Audiology, June 2004, Vol. 13, 62-72. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/009)
History: Received June 13, 2003 , Accepted January 7, 2004
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2004, Vol. 13, 62-72. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/009)
History: Received June 13, 2003; Accepted January 7, 2004

Cochlear implants support deaf students' language development through the improved use of audition in the classroom. Unfortunately, the acoustics of typical classrooms greatly reduce auditory speech perception by these students. Sound-field systems can increase speech-to-noise ratios in classrooms and thus improve use of audition. These systems are used by 80% of students with cochlear implants who use an FM system in the classroom. The present study compares speech perception by 14 school-age cochlear implant recipients via 2 classroom sound-field systems, 1 wall-mounted and the other a personal, or desktop, system. Testing was conducted in 2 classroom environments, 1 noisy and reverberant (typical of many classrooms) and the other ideally quiet with reverberation of short duration. In the quiet room with low reverberation, both sound-field systems produced improved phoneme recognition, but there was no difference between the 2. In the noisy room with high reverberation, the sound-field benefits were greater, and the desktop systems provided more benefit than the wall-mounted systems.

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