Evaluation of an Adaptive Directional System in a DSP Hearing Aid The effectiveness of an adaptive directional microphone design, as implemented in the Phonak Claro behind-the-ear hearing aid, is evaluated. Participants were fit bilaterally and tested in 2 environments, an anechoic chamber and a moderately reverberant classroom, with the microphones in the fixed (cardioid) setting and the adaptive setting. Five speakers ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
Evaluation of an Adaptive Directional System in a DSP Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth A. Bentler, PhD
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, 250 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246
  • Jill L. Tubbs
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, 250 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246
  • Jessica L. M. Egge
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, 250 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246
  • Gregory A. Flamme
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, 250 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246
  • Andrew B. Dittberner
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, 250 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ruth-bentler@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
Evaluation of an Adaptive Directional System in a DSP Hearing Aid
American Journal of Audiology, June 2004, Vol. 13, 73-79. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/010)
History: Received November 3, 2003 , Accepted January 21, 2004
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2004, Vol. 13, 73-79. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2004/010)
History: Received November 3, 2003; Accepted January 21, 2004

The effectiveness of an adaptive directional microphone design, as implemented in the Phonak Claro behind-the-ear hearing aid, is evaluated. Participants were fit bilaterally and tested in 2 environments, an anechoic chamber and a moderately reverberant classroom, with the microphones in the fixed (cardioid) setting and the adaptive setting. Five speakers were placed between 110° and 250° azimuth around the listener. Speech-weighted noise was presented from those speakers at an overall level (OAL) of 65 dB (A). Noise was increased by 8 dB from 1 speaker at a time, using 2-s modulation and random assignment, while the output from the other speakers was reduced to maintain the constant OAL. Results of 2 speech perception tasks used as outcome measures indicated that the adaptive system was not able to follow the dominant noise source in the presence of lower level noise sources. Selfreport measures obtained after blinded home trials were consistent with laboratory findings that the participants did not perceive this adaptive microphone design to be more effective than the default fixed-microphone option.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this work were presented at the American Auditory Society, Scottsdale, AZ, March 2002. We would like to acknowledge the Retirement Research Foundation for their support of this research project. We are also grateful to Laura Voll and Phonak for the provision of the hearing aids.
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