Paper  |   December 2009
Screening for Hearing Loss in the Elderly Using Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions, Pure Tones, and a Self-Assessment Tool
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tina Jupiter
    St. John’s University, Jamaica, NY, and Long Island AuD Consortium
  • Contact author: Tina Jupiter, St. John’s University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Jamaica, NY 11439. E-mail: jupitert@stjohns.edu.
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging
Paper   |   December 2009
Screening for Hearing Loss in the Elderly Using Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions, Pure Tones, and a Self-Assessment Tool
American Journal of Audiology, December 2009, Vol. 18, 99-107. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2009/08-0020)
History: Received July 14, 2008 , Revised November 6, 2008 , Accepted April 22, 2009
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2009, Vol. 18, 99-107. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2009/08-0020)
History: Received July 14, 2008; Revised November 6, 2008; Accepted April 22, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose: To determine whether distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) could be used as a hearing screening tool with elderly individuals living independently, and to compare the utility of different screening protocols: (a) 3 pure-tone screening protocols consisting of 30 dB HL at 1, 2, and 3 kHz; 40 dB HL at 1, 2, and 3 kHz; or 40 dB HL at 1 and 2 kHz; (b) the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly—Screening version (HHIE–S); (c) pure tones at 40 dB HL at 1 and 2 kHz plus the HHIE–S; and (d) DPOAEs.

Method: A total of 106 elderly individuals age 65–91 years were screened using the above protocols.

Results: Pass/fail results showed that most individuals failed at 30 dB HL, followed by DPOAEs, the 40-dB HL protocols, the HHIE–S alone, and the combined pure-tone/HHIE–S protocol. All screening results were associated except the HHIE–S and 30 dB HL and the HHIE–S and DPOAEs. A McNemar analysis revealed that the differences between the correlated pass/fail results were significant except for the HHIE–S and 40 dB at 1 and 2 kHz.

Conclusion: DPOAEs can be used to screen the elderly, with the advantage that individuals do not have to voluntarily respond to the test.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank Bridget Tobin for her help in data collection and analysis, and Bridget Gallagher from Jewish Home Lifecare for her support.
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